Springhill mining disasters

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On Thursday, October 23, 1958 at approximately 8:06 PM[1] the No. 2 Colliery just outside the town of Springhill N. S. Was struck by an underground shift in the mine. Oct 23, 2013 · "The Springhill Bump" The 1958 Bump which occurred on October 23, 1958 was the most severe "bump" (underground earthquake) in North American mining . Springhill Mining Disaster Lyrics: Bono (Spoken): Like to I'd like to try a song that I think we've only played once before, so. This is a city that a a lot of.
In the 1950s, the town of Springhill, N.S., was devastated by two of the worst mining disasters in Canadian history. An explosion in 1956 killed 39 miners, and. Lyrics to 'Springhill Mine Disaster' by Seeger Peggy. SPRINGHILL MINE DISASTER / Dm C Dm C / In the town of Springhill, Nova Scotia / Dm. On Thursday, October 23, 1958 at approximately 8:06 PM[1] the No. 2 Colliery just outside the town of Springhill N. S. Was struck by an underground shift in the mine. Oct 23, 2013 · "The Springhill Bump" The 1958 Bump which occurred on October 23, 1958 was the most severe "bump" (underground earthquake) in North American mining . Springhill Mining Disaster Lyrics: Bono (Spoken): Like to I'd like to try a song that I think we've only played once before, so. This is a city that a a lot of.

Earth

Springhill Mining Disasters - 1891, 1956 and 1958

Coal mining in Springhill, Nova Scotia began shortly after the community was settled in the early 19th century. A small mine was opened in 1834 and larger-scale mining town mining in 1872. Explosive coal dust -- a fine powder produced during the mining process -- and methane gas trapped inside coal deposits made for a dangerous combination, and three major explosions at the Springhill mine, in 1891, 1956 and 1958, claimed the lives of local men and boys. In mining village wales, the town lost 182 men in over 125 accidents between the 1891 and 1956 explosions.

In the February 21, 1891 explosion at the Springhill mine, 125 men and boys were killed. The second major explosion at the mine occurred on November 1, 1956 in number 4 pit. Fire and a methane gas explosion hindered rescue efforts so that while 88 miners were rescued, 39 died.

The third major explosion at the Springhill mining engineer description happened on October 23, 1958 in number 2 pit, shortly after 8 p.m. as the afternoon shift was at work. The pit, opened in 1873, best mining the only remaining colliery in Springhill and was also the deepest coal mine in North America. It extended over 14,000 feet (4,200 metres) to the bottom of the mine. A "bump", the miners' term for an springhill mining disasters earthquake, springhill mining disasters, shook the mine and the town above. The result was that 174 miners were trapped in the mine. In parts of the mine the ceiling was compressed into the floor and contact with miners below 7,800 feet (2,340 metres) level was cut off.

Source

Surface buildings, no. 1 slope, Springhill mine, Nova Scotia, 1897

Large pockets of methane gas meant that draegermen, men specially trained for mine rescues, had to be used for the rescue efforts. They had special breathing equipment that promised the greatest chance of success. The draegermen were mostly miners themselves, springhill mining disasters, and many had assisted with the 1956 rescue efforts. Still, the gas was so heavy it smothered the safety lamps used by the draegermen. Further, the damage from the explosion meant that tunnels had been reduced to crawl spaces and barefaced rescuers had to lie down to clear a passageway.

By morning, 81 miners had been freed. As October 25th dawned, officials believed that any men still below the surface were dead. Rescue efforts continued, however, and on October 29th, rescuers heard a voice from one of a group of 12 miners who had been trapped in a dungeon for six days. Three of these miners were survivors of the 1956 explosion. Saving these men meant tunneling through 25 metres of coal as small bumps continued. Seven more miners, the last survivors, were out by 9:15 a.m. on November 1st.

It was a magnificent rescue. Although 74 miners died, 100 were saved. The rescuers' efforts were recognized when they were awarded the Royal Humane Association Gold Medal for bravery in lifesaving, the first time the medal had been awarded to a group.

The Carnegie Hero Fund Commission presented a gold medal and bronze plaque to the rescuers and five of them were awarded Scout Silver Crosses.

Deemed too dangerous for operations to continue, the Springhill mine closed in 1959. Today, the abandoned coal mines of Springhill provide geothermal energy for various industries in the area.

 

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U2 – Springhill Mining Disaster Lyrics | Genius Lyrics

Springhill Mining Disaster Lyrics: Bono (Spoken): Like to I'd like to try a song that I think we've only played once before, so. This is a city that a a lot of. Springhill Mining Disasters - 1891, 1956 and 1958. Coal mining in Springhill, Nova Scotia began shortly after the community was settled in the early 19th century. A small mine was opened in 1834 and larger-scale mining started in 1872.

Springhill Mining Disasters - 1891, 1956 and 1958. Coal mining in Springhill, Nova Scotia began shortly after the community was settled in the early 19th century. A small mine was opened in 1834 and larger-scale mining started in 1872. Springhill Mining Disaster Lyrics: Bono (Spoken): Like to I'd like to try a song that I think we've only played once before, so. This is a city that a a lot of. On Thursday, October 23, 1958 at approximately 8:06 PM[1] the No. 2 Colliery just outside the town of Springhill N. S. Was struck by an underground shift in the mine.


1. Springhill, Nova Scotia – Springhill is a Canadian community located in central Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. The community was originally named Springhill Mines, Coal mining lead to economic growth, with its incorporation as a town in 1889. Springhill is located on the edge of the Cobequid Hills midway between the Minas Basin and the Northumberland Strait. The elevation in this area varies from 140 to 185 metres above sea level, located in the carboniferous area on the southern side of the Cumberland Coal Basin, Springhills six main coal seams overlap. The seams dip to the northwest at an angle of thirty-five degrees, Coal was so prevalent in Springhill that there was a time when men got coal out of their backyards, shallow pits were found everywhere. In recent years, there have been instances when a homeowner would step out of his door only to find a big gaping hole where his driveway had been, another part of an old mine had caved in. Springhill was the site of three devastating mining disasters during the era of industrial mining from the 1870s until the early 1960s. The first two disasters in 1891 and 1956 were caused by explosions and fires in the mines, the third and final disaster in 1958 accelerated the closure of the largest mines and was what was known as a bump, or underground upheaval. The abrupt end of large-scale industrial coal mining presented incredible economic challenges for the region as residents struggled with unemployment in the 1960s. An unexpected legacy and benefit from the coal mines is being realized in the form of geothermal energy. Since their closure, the mines have filled with water which is heated to an average temperature of 18° C by the surrounding earth. Other companies, such as lead–acid battery manufacturer Surrette Battery and Benjamin Heating Products continue to operate in the community, chalice, a charity affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church, is headquartered in Springhill. With over 46,000 children sponsored it is the largest Catholic child sponsorship program in Canada, upon dissolution, Springhill became part of the Municipality of the County of Cumberland, comprising approximately 1/5 of the population of that municipality. The decision was criticized by residents who alleged a lack of consultation by the town council. However, the decision was supported by other residents as a good choice. Springhill is 5 km south of the Via Rail station in Springhill Junction and it is a stop on request station along the route of the Ocean which runs between Montreal and Halifax

2. Cumberland County, Nova Scotia – Cumberland County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. The Mikmaq name for the area was Kwesomalegek meaning hardwood point, Cumberland County was founded on August 17,1759. When the Township of Parrsboro was divided in 1840, one part was annexed to Cumberland County, the dividing line between Cumberland and Colchester was established in 1840. In 1897, a portion of the line between the Counties of Colchester and Cumberland was fixed and defined. The county thrived in the 19th century with the development of lumbering, shipbuilding, deforestation and rural outmigration in the 20th century led to the abandonment of some communities such as Eatonville and New Yarmouth. The county has an area of 4,271.23 km2. Cumberland County is rich in natural resources with extensive forest land supporting lumber mills and it has many mineral resources, including 2 operating salt mines. Until the 1970s it also had coal mines which extracted coal from seams that run from Joggins to River Hebert and on to Athol. The northwestern edge of Cumberland County forms part of the Isthmus of Chignecto, as such, the county hosts several important transportation corridors, including Highway 104 and CN Rails Halifax-Montreal railway line. Two towns are located in Cumberland County, Amherst and Oxford. 3% from its 2011 population of 31,353. With a land area of 4,277.86 km2, with a land area of 4,255.04 km2, it had a population density of 4. 6/km2 in 2016. Royal eponyms in Canada Black Lake listings within Nova Scotia, Cumberland County official site Photographs of the Cumberland County War Memorial monument, Amherst Photographs of historic monuments in Cumberland County

3. Dominion Coal Company – The Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation was a Canadian coal mining and steel manufacturing company. DOSCO was one of the largest private employers in Canada during the 1930s-1950s, in 1957, DOSCO was purchased as a subsidiary of A. V. Roe Canada Ltd. and was assumed in 1962 by Hawker Siddeley Canada. Industrial Cape Breton consisted of two geographic regions for industrial activity, the north side of Sydney Harbour, and the south side. The north side was dominated in the 1800s by the General Mining Association, several independent collieries opened on the south side and by the 1870s, Canadas federal government had implemented its National Policy of economic protectionist measures. The group purchased one mine and obtained options on others south of Sydney in eastern Cape Breton Island and this process took some months, and Whitney was not ready to consolidate operations at Sydney until early 1893. On February 1,1893, Dominion Coal Company Ltd. was incorporated with Whitney as president, B. F. Whitney as secretary and these were consolidated and operated as a department of the company, and in 1895 were extended south to Louisbourg. The railroad lines were incorporated in 1910 as the Sydney and Louisburg Railway, by 1912, DOMCO operated 16 collieries, comprising 40% of Canadas coal production. The company effected numerous efficiencies and improvements, there were, however, costly mistakes, prominent among them the tendency to become locked into low-price contracts, thus missing a large market at higher prices. By 1901 some 90 percent of its output was committed to such low-price contracts, the company made a large public offering of stock, which tumbled in price when Whitney failed to get the American import duty on coal removed or at least reduced. Flushed with the success of creating DOMCO in the 1890s, the Whitney syndicate sought to create a use for coal resulting from mixing and screening processes at DOMCOs coal wash plants. Whitney expanded operations at Sydney with the organization in March 1899 of the Dominion Iron & Steel Company Ltd. which had funding in both Canada and the United States, Whitney was joined in the new enterprise by his long-time business friends F. S. Barney, H. F. Dimock, A. H. Paget, located on the south side of Sydney Harbour, which Whitney said offered more advantages to steel making than anywhere else in the world, the mill was completed in 1901. Competitors in Britain, France, Germany and the United States were initially concerned, however, continuing problems of management and cost control led to Whitneys early withdrawal from the project. Later in 1901, Whitney and his associates sold majority control of DOMCO to engineer turned businessman James Ross of Montreal, and their minority share of DISCO to Ross and other Canadian interests. Whitney resigned as president of DISCO in 1902 and as a member of the DOMCO board in December 1909, in 1903, Ross and the Canadian investors in DISCO sold control to James H. Plummer of Toronto, Ontario. P. Jones 1906-1910 M. J. Butler 1910-1916 D. H, the fall-out from World War I saw a syndicate of British investors led by Montreal, Quebec industrialist Roy M. Wolvin negotiate a takeover of Dominion Steel Corporation from Plummer in 1919. BESCO proposed a $500 million merger of DOMCO and DISCO, along with various British steel, in 1921, SCOTIA was merged with the conglomerate to form the British Empire Steel Corporation

4. Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation – The Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation was a Canadian coal mining and steel manufacturing company. DOSCO was one of the largest private employers in Canada during the 1930s-1950s, in 1957, DOSCO was purchased as a subsidiary of A. V. Roe Canada Ltd. and was assumed in 1962 by Hawker Siddeley Canada. Industrial Cape Breton consisted of two geographic regions for industrial activity, the north side of Sydney Harbour, and the south side. The north side was dominated in the 1800s by the General Mining Association, several independent collieries opened on the south side and by the 1870s, Canadas federal government had implemented its National Policy of economic protectionist measures. The group purchased one mine and obtained options on others south of Sydney in eastern Cape Breton Island and this process took some months, and Whitney was not ready to consolidate operations at Sydney until early 1893. On February 1,1893, Dominion Coal Company Ltd. was incorporated with Whitney as president, B. F. Whitney as secretary and these were consolidated and operated as a department of the company, and in 1895 were extended south to Louisbourg. The railroad lines were incorporated in 1910 as the Sydney and Louisburg Railway, by 1912, DOMCO operated 16 collieries, comprising 40% of Canadas coal production. The company effected numerous efficiencies and improvements, there were, however, costly mistakes, prominent among them the tendency to become locked into low-price contracts, thus missing a large market at higher prices. By 1901 some 90 percent of its output was committed to such low-price contracts, the company made a large public offering of stock, which tumbled in price when Whitney failed to get the American import duty on coal removed or at least reduced. Flushed with the success of creating DOMCO in the 1890s, the Whitney syndicate sought to create a use for coal resulting from mixing and screening processes at DOMCOs coal wash plants. Whitney expanded operations at Sydney with the organization in March 1899 of the Dominion Iron & Steel Company Ltd. which had funding in both Canada and the United States, Whitney was joined in the new enterprise by his long-time business friends F. S. Barney, H. F. Dimock, A. H. Paget, located on the south side of Sydney Harbour, which Whitney said offered more advantages to steel making than anywhere else in the world, the mill was completed in 1901. Competitors in Britain, France, Germany and the United States were initially concerned, however, continuing problems of management and cost control led to Whitneys early withdrawal from the project. Later in 1901, Whitney and his associates sold majority control of DOMCO to engineer turned businessman James Ross of Montreal, and their minority share of DISCO to Ross and other Canadian interests. Whitney resigned as president of DISCO in 1902 and as a member of the DOMCO board in December 1909, in 1903, Ross and the Canadian investors in DISCO sold control to James H. Plummer of Toronto, Ontario. P. Jones 1906-1910 M. J. Butler 1910-1916 D. H, the fall-out from World War I saw a syndicate of British investors led by Montreal, Quebec industrialist Roy M. Wolvin negotiate a takeover of Dominion Steel Corporation from Plummer in 1919. BESCO proposed a $500 million merger of DOMCO and DISCO, along with various British steel, in 1921, SCOTIA was merged with the conglomerate to form the British Empire Steel Corporation

5. Avro Canada – Avro Canada was a Canadian aircraft manufacturing company. It started in 1945 as a plant and within thirteen years became the third-largest company in Canada, one of the largest 100 companies in the world. Avro Canada was best known for the highly advanced CF-105 Arrow, following the cancellation of the CF-105 Arrow the company ceased operations in 1962. During the Second World War, Victory Aircraft in Malton, Ontario, was Canadas largest aircraft manufacturer. Prior to 1939, as a part of National Steel Car Ltd. of Hamilton, National Steel Car had turned out Avro Anson trainers, Handley Page Hampden bombers, Hawker Hurricane fighters and Westland Lysander army cooperation aircraft. National Steel Car Corporation of Malton, Ontario was formed in 1938 and renamed Victory Aircraft Limited in 1942 when the Canadian government took over ownership and management of main plant. During the Second World War, Victory Aircraft built Avro aircraft,3,197 Anson trainers,430 Lancaster bombers, six Lancastrian, one Lincoln bomber and one York transport. In 1944, an Advisory Committee on Aircraft Manufacture was established by the Canadian government, bob Leckie of the RCAF was a strong advocate over many years, for a wholly domestic end-to-end industry, that would design and build aircraft in Canada. However, the Department of National Defense, according to Avros Roy Dobson, gave a reception to doing any more than the fabrication and assembly of aircraft. In 1945, the UK-based Hawker Siddeley Group purchased Victory Aircraft from the Canadian government, roe Canada Ltd. as the wholly owned Canadian branch of its aircraft manufacturing subsidiary, UK-based A. V. Avro Canada began operations in the former Victory plant, from the outset, the company invested in research and development and embarked on an ambitious design program with a jet engine and a jet-powered fighter and airliner on the drawing boards. Roe Canada Ltd. was restructured in 1954 as a company with two aviation subsidiaries, Avro Aircraft Ltd. and Orenda Engines Ltd. which began operating under these names on 1 January 1955. Each companies facilities were each were located across each other in a complex at the perimeter of Malton Airport. The total labour force of both companies reached 15,000 in 1958. During the same period, with Crawford Gordon as president, A. V, roe Canada Ltd. purchased a number of companies, including Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation, Canada Car and Foundry, and Canadian Steel Improvement. In 1956 the companies generated 45% of the revenue of the Hawker Siddeley Group, in 1958, annual sales revenue was approximately $450 million, ranking A. V. Roe Canada as the third largest corporation in Canada by capitalization, by the time of the cancellation of the Arrow and Iroquois, aircraft-related production amounted to approximately 40% of the companys activities with 60% industrial and commercial. In 1956,500,000 shares were issued to the public at a value of $8 million

6. Geothermal heating – Geothermal heating is the direct use of geothermal energy for heating some applications. Humans have taken advantage of geothermal heat this way since the Paleolithic era, approximately seventy countries made direct use of a total of 270 PJ of geothermal heating in 2004. As of 2007,28 GW of geothermal heating capacity is installed around the world, thermal efficiency is high since no energy conversion is needed, but capacity factors tend to be low since the heat is mostly needed in the winter. Geothermal energy originates from the heat retained within the Earth since the formation of the planet, from radioactive decay of minerals. Most high temperature geothermal heat is harvested in regions close to tectonic plate boundaries where volcanic activity rises close to the surface of the Earth, in these areas, ground and groundwater can be found with temperatures higher than the target temperature of the application. However, even cold ground contains heat, below 6 metres the undisturbed ground temperature is consistently at the Mean Annual Air Temperature, there are a wide variety of applications for cheap geothermal heat. In 2004 more than half of direct geothermal heat was used for heating. The remainder was used for a variety of processes, desalination, domestic hot water. The cities of Reykjavík and Akureyri pipe hot water from geothermal plants under roads, geothermal systems tend to benefit from economies of scale, so space heating power is often distributed to multiple buildings, sometimes whole communities. This technique, long practiced throughout the world in such as Reykjavík, Iceland, Boise, Idaho. Some parts of the world, including portions of the western USA, are underlain by relatively shallow geothermal resources. Similar conditions exist in Iceland, parts of Japan, and other hot spots around the world. In these areas, water or steam may be captured from natural hot springs, alternatively, the heat may come from waste heat supplied by co-generation from a geothermal electrical plant or from deep wells into hot aquifers. Direct geothermal heating is far more efficient than geothermal electricity generation and has less demanding temperature requirements, if the shallow ground is hot but dry, air or water may be circulated through earth tubes or downhole heat exchangers which act as heat exchangers with the ground. Steam under pressure from deep geothermal resources is used to generate electricity from geothermal power. The Iceland Deep Drilling Project struck a pocket of magma at 2, a cemented steelcase was constructed in the hole with a perforation at the bottom close to the magma. The high temperatures and pressure of the steam were used to generate 36MW of electricity. In areas where the ground is too cold to provide comfort directly

7. History of Nova Scotia – For military history, see Military history of Nova Scotia Nova Scotia is a Canadian province located in Canadas Maritimes. The region was occupied by Mikmaq. During the first 150 years of European settlement, the colony was made up of Catholic Acadians. This time period involved six wars in which the Mikmaq along with the French, during Father Le Loutres War, the capital was moved from Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia to the newly established Halifax, Nova Scotia. The warfare ended with the Burying the Hatchet Ceremony, after the colonial wars, New England Planters and Foreign Protestants settled Nova Scotia. After the American Revolution, the colony was settled by Loyalists, during the nineteenth century, Nova Scotia became self-governing in 1848 and joined the Canadian Confederation in 1867. The colonial history of Nova Scotia includes the present-day Canadian Maritime provinces and northern Maine, in 1763 Cape Breton Island and St. Johns Island became part of Nova Scotia. In 1769, St. Johns Island became a separate colony, Nova Scotia included present-day New Brunswick until that province was established in 1784. The oldest evidence of humans in Nova Scotia indicates the Paleo-Indians were the first, natives are believed to have been present in the area between 11,000 and 5,000 years ago. The Mikmaq are a First Nations people, indigenous to the Maritime Provinces, míkmaw is the singular form of Míkmaq. In 1616 Father Biard believed the Mikmaq population to be in excess of 3,000, however, he remarked that, because of European diseases, including smallpox and alcoholism, there had been large population losses in the previous century. At the time of contact with the French they were expanding from their Maritime base westward along the Gaspé Peninsula /St, Lawrence River at the expense of Iroquioian Mohawk tribes, hence the Mikmaq name for this peninsula, Gespedeg. They were amenable to limited French settlement in their midst, with the complete loss by France during the Seven Years War of its North American territories, the Mi’kmaq lost their primary ally. The Mi’kmaq continued to suffer a collapse and with the influx of Planters in the 1760s and Loyalists in the 1780s. Later on the Mikmaq also settled Newfoundland as the unrelated Beothuk tribe became extinct, giovanni Cabotos voyage received financial backing by Italian banking houses in London and the Bardi family banking firm of Florence. With financing secure and patent issued by Henry VII to Caboto, upon landing on 24 June 1497, Caboto raised the Venetian and Papal banners, claiming the land for the King of England and recognising the religious authority of the Roman Catholic Church. After this landing, Cabot spent some weeks discovering the coast, Cabotos expedition is believed to be the first by Europeans to mainland North America since the Vikings five hundred years before. Historian Alwyn Ruddock who worked on Caboto and his era for 35 years suggested Fr, Nova Scotia was further explored by the Portuguese explorer João Álvares Fagundes as he searched south of his fishing settlements in Newfoundland

8. Bluenose – Bluenose was a fishing and racing schooner built in 1921 in Nova Scotia, Canada. Nicknamed the Queen of the North Atlantic, she was commemorated by a replica, Bluenose II. The name Bluenose originated as a nickname for Nova Scotians from as early as the late 18th century, designed by William Roué, the vessel was intended for both fishing and racing duties. Intended to compete with American schooners for speed, the design that Roué originally drafted in Fall 1920 had a length of 36.6 metres which was 2.4 metres too long for the competition. Sent back to redesign the schooner, Roué produced a revised outline, the accepted revisal placed the inside ballast on top of the keel to ensure that it was as low as possible, improving the overall speed of the vessel. One further alteration to the design took place during construction. The bow was raised by.5 metres to more room in the forecastle for the crew to eat. The alteration was approved of by Roué, the change in increased the sheer in the vessels bow, giving the schooner a unique appearance. The design that was accepted and later built was a combination of the designs of both Nova Scotian and American shipbuilders had been constructing for the North Atlantic fishing fleet. The vessel was constructed of Nova Scotian pine, spruce, birch and oak, Bluenose had a displacement of 258 tonnes and was 43.6 metres long overall and 34.1 metres at the waterline. The vessel had a beam of 8.2 metres and a draught of 4.85 metres, the schooner carried 930 square metres of sail. Bluenoses mainmast reached 38.4 metres above deck and the schooners foremast reached 31.3 metres and her mainboom was 24.7 metres and the schooners foreboom was 9.9 metres. The vessel had a crew of 20 and her hull was painted black, the vessel cost $35,000 to build. Bluenose was constructed by Smith and Rhuland in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, the schooners keel was laid in 1920. The Governor General the Duke of Devonshire drove a spike into the timber during the keel-laying ceremony. She was launched on 26 March 1921, and christened by Audrey Smith, Bluenose was completed in April 1921 and performed her sea trials out of Lunenburg. On 15 April, the departed to fish for the first time. Bluenose, being a Lunenburg schooner, used the dory trawl method, Lunenburg schooners carried eight dories, each manned by two members of the crew, called dorymen

9. Habitation at Port-Royal

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