Mining botnet

By | 18.03.2018
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The botnet is comprised of devices infected with the ZeroAccess trojan, which carries out click fraud, causing victims to unknowingly click ads that drive money to scammers. The botnet can also instruct infected computers to conduct Bitcoin mining. Figure 3 shows Adylkuzz mining Monero cryptocurrency, a process that can be more easily distributed across a botnet like that created here than in the case of Bitcoin, which now generally requires dedicated, high-performance machines. Why is that dumb? Well, bitcoin "mining" is essentially a race between computers all over the world to complete complex math problems. In the early days of bitcoin.
Bitcoins are valuable, in large part because mining for bitcoins takes a lot of resources. At Black Hat a pair of researchers demonstrated that it's possible to gain. Mining cryptocurrencies can be a costly investment, but creative cybercriminals have found a money-making solution. Researchers say a newly discovered botnet. The botnet is comprised of devices infected with the ZeroAccess trojan, which carries out click fraud, causing victims to unknowingly click ads that drive money to scammers. The botnet can also instruct infected computers to conduct Bitcoin mining. Figure 3 shows Adylkuzz mining Monero cryptocurrency, a process that can be more easily distributed across a botnet like that created here than in the case of Bitcoin, which now generally requires dedicated, high-performance machines. Why is that dumb? Well, bitcoin "mining" is essentially a race between computers all over the world to complete complex math problems. In the early days of bitcoin.

Mining cryptocurrencies can be a costly investment, mining botnet creative cybercriminals have found a money-making solution.

Researchers mining botnet a newly discovered botnet consisting of 15,000 machines is stealing computing power to mine increasingly valuable cryptocurrencies like Monero to enrich a hacker named “Bond007.01.”

The entire “BondNet botnet” operation is netting around $25,000 per month, mining botnet, according to researchers at the Israeli security firm GuardiCore Labs. The victims include high-profile global companies, universities, city councils and other public institutions. They’re not losing money, just resources: Hackers have long known that when you don’t have to pay for the electricity powering the processors, cryptocurrency mining is pure profit. As bitcoin and its variants continue to rise to unprecedented value, the reward for such a scheme will increasingly outweigh the risk.

The price of Monero, a privacy-focused cryptocurrency that hides transactions, has risen 2,109 percent in the last year. The last month alone has seen a 44 percent rise in price.

Bond007.01 is suspected to be located in China, mining botnet, due to the use of copy-and-pasted code originating from Chinese websites, unique handling of Chinese desktop victims and the compiling of the BondNet C&C server on a Chinese computer, Ofri Ziv, GuardiCore’s vice president of research, told CyberScoop.

Bond007.01, who also goes by the alias leebond986, has a habit of reusing code via very simple constructs that lead researchers to believe it’s a single actor.

Bond007.01 uses a variety of mining botnet vulnerabilities and bad passwords to attack mostly old and unsupported Windows Servers machines, mining botnet. The most common attack vector uses MySQL to install a remote access Trojan (RAT) and cryptocurrency miner.

The compromised machines then expand the botnet infrastructure, conduct attacks and serve up malware like cryptocurrency miners or command-and-control servers.

“Building an attack infrastructure on top of victim machines helps conceal the attacker’s true identity and origin of the attack,” the researchers explained. “It also provides high availability infrastructure, which is very helpful when relying on compromised servers, providing infinite backup options in case one of the servers fails or loses connectivity to the internet.”

Monero is most common but Bond007.01 also mines currencies like ZCash.

The botnet is growing at a rate of around 500 new machines per day, while about the same number are delisted, the researchers mining base is because the vast majority of targets are not aware of security and are applying minimal to no mining botnet measures in servers,” Ziv explained. “Administrators that do respond seem to be doing this because of the spike in the CPU load rather than being aware of a ‘vulnerability’. We see many cases of reinfection, that is machines that are reinfected after being cleaned.”

That’s a mistake, GuardiCore researchers say, mining botnet, not only because it’s pouring money into ael service mining hacker’s coffers but because the compromised machines can easily be used for any purpose mining botnet attacker wishes.

“While organisations can treat this a minor issue atlas copco construction mining increased electric bills, mining botnet, with relatively simple modifications this backdoor is capable of taking complete control of thousands of victim machines, many of which contain sensitive information like mail servers,” the researchers explained. “Today’s mining may easily become a ransomware campaign, data exfiltration or lateral movement inside the victim’s network.”

-In this Story-

BondNet, botnet, china, Chinese hackers, cryptocurrency, GuardiCore, mining botnet, Monero

Источник:




Got a botnet? Thinking of using it to mine Bitcoin? Don't bother • The Register

Why is that dumb? Well, bitcoin "mining" is essentially a race between computers all over the world to complete complex math problems. In the early days of bitcoin. Jan 17, 2018 · A new variant of the Satori botnet has raised again with a new target, and this one is hacking into Claymore mining rigs. Microsoft has gone on the offensive against Sefnit: remotely removing an old version of Tor from two million computers.

Mining cryptocurrencies can be a costly investment, but creative cybercriminals have found a money-making solution. Researchers say a newly discovered botnet. Jan 17, 2018 · A new variant of the Satori botnet has raised again with a new target, and this one is hacking into Claymore mining rigs. Why is that dumb? Well, bitcoin "mining" is essentially a race between computers all over the world to complete complex math problems. In the early days of bitcoin.


The massive Satori botnet has reappeared with a new target. According to security researchers , the collection of compromised Internet of Things devices has been directed to attack rigs built for mining the cryptocurrency Ethereum.

According to Qihoo 360 Netlab, a variant of the Satori botnet dubbed Satori.Coin.Robber has been spotted in the wild scanning for machines used to mine for Ethereum in an attempt to hijack the cryptocurrency.

The researchers have not provided much in terms of detail as to how the botnet works—a precaution taken to prevent further abuse—but offered enough information to show the botnet is active and has successfully hit Ethereum mining rigs.

The specialized variant of the botnet—which at a time consisted of hundreds of thousands of internet-connected devices that were hijacked by using manufacturer-set default credentials that were never changed—hosts similar exploits as the original version but scans specifically for mining machines.

Those rigs can be identified relatively easy by the botnet. It searches for machines running Windows operating systems that have opened management port 3333, a Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) port that allows the machine to establish a connection with another host and exchange streams of data—in this case, Ethereum.

The botnet looks for machines running Claymore Miner software, a popular tool used for mining for Ethereum—a process done by lending computing power from the machine’s processor to solve complex mathematical equations required to confirm the validity of transactions.

Once the botnet finds a system running Claymore Miner with an open 3333 port with no password authentication enabled—which is inexplicably the default setting—it launches its attack to hijack the mining efforts.

First, Satori.Coin.Robber delivers a malicious payload that gathers information about the mining state of the rig. Then botnet replaces the wallet address on the host machine with its own wallet address. Finally, it reboots the system with the new address, which results in the Ethereum mined by the rigs being delivered to the attackers and leaves the miners with little to show for their efforts.

The researchers determined the botnet is active and has secured 0.9566 Ethereum (about $840) in the last two days. In total, it has paid out just over 1.01 Ethereum, or about $884.

Despite that, a person claiming ownership over the Satori.Coin.Robber attack told Netlab that the botnet is not currently active. "Satori dev here, don't be alarmed about this bot it does not currently have any malicious packeting purposes move along," he told the security researchers.

Given the exponential growth that Ethereum has experienced over the past year, including a nearly 100 percent increase in value during the first weeks of 2018, it’s understandable why the cryptocurrency has become such a target for attackers. It is increasingly profitable, and an attack like Satori.Coin.Robber allows it to be mined with minimal effort.

Users mining for Ethereum with Claymore Miner software should always make sure they are using the latest version of the software and configure their rigs to require a password to prevent exploits such as this botnet attack.

Источник:

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3 thoughts on “Mining botnet

  1. what is video card mining

    minecraft no mining challenge

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