Yanacocha mining

By | 12.02.2018
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Unlock in-depth intelligence about Yanacocha. As data gatherers for over 30 years, MiningIntelligence is your trusted resource to put critical and timely information. Yanacocha produces ore from two open pits and is reclaiming three. First production came from the Carachugo pit, followed by Maqui Maqui in 1994 and the San José Sur . Yanacocha is an open-pit, cyanide gold mine located 3,900 metres above sea level in Cajamarca. The site is operated by American multinational Newmont Mining Corporation, Peruvian company Minas Buenaventura (part of the Benavides group) and the World Bank International Finance Corporation (IFC).
Yanacocha (Cajamarca Quechua: yana = "black, dark", qucha = "lake, puddle, pond, lagoon") is a gold mine in the Cajamarca region of the Northern Highlands, the poorest province of Peru. Considered to be the fourth largest gold mine in the world, it produced 0.97 million ounces of gold in 2014. The sheer scale of the Yanacocha gold mine in Cajamarca, Peru, is staggering. It is the largest gold mine in Latin America, and the second largest in the world. Unlock in-depth intelligence about Yanacocha. As data gatherers for over 30 years, MiningIntelligence is your trusted resource to put critical and timely information. Yanacocha produces ore from two open pits and is reclaiming three. First production came from the Carachugo pit, followed by Maqui Maqui in 1994 and the San José Sur . Yanacocha is an open-pit, cyanide gold mine located 3,900 metres above sea level in Cajamarca. The site is operated by American multinational Newmont Mining Corporation, Peruvian company Minas Buenaventura (part of the Benavides group) and the World Bank International Finance Corporation (IFC).

Yanacocha

Peru | Cajamarca : Newmont

Two locals near Cerro Quilish the proposed expansion site of the mine.

The sheer scale of the Nicehash dual mining decred gold mine in Cajamarca, Peru, is staggering. It is the largest gold mine in Latin America, and the second largest in the world, yanacocha mining, covering 535 square miles.

The Minera Yanacocha company runs the mine, which is owned by Newmont Mining Corporation from Colorado, a Peruvian mining company, yanacocha mining the World Bank's International Finance Corporation (IFC).

Majority-owner Newmont refers to Yanacocha as its "crown jewel" and the mine generates c4d mining large portion of Newmont's profits. But ever since its launch in 1993, the mine has also generated controversy and damaging social and environmental impacts.

Critics of the mine say the government granted the concession to Minera Yanacocha after accepting bribes from Newmont, and without properly consulting with, and obtaining consent from local communities. Yanacocha also began operations using massive open pits and leach pads in an environmentally sensitive area full of farms yanacocha mining rely on water coming from the mountains in the mine area.


The Yanacocha Mine.

Pollution fears, realized

Local organizations critical of the mine claim that yanacocha mining local water sources have become contaminated, their traditional medicinal plants have declined and that the influx of job seekers to the area has increased crime. Farmers have felt pressure to sell their lands to the mine.

The yanacocha mining and failure yanacocha mining properly recognize the community's right to consent to the mine have yanacocha mining on peoples' rights to a sustainable livelihood and ability to determine their economic development.

In addition, the mine has become known for toxic contamination that it has caused, yanacocha mining. In June 2000, one of Minera Yanacocha's contractors spilled 150 kilograms (335 pounds) of mercury from the uosteam mining along a 43-kilometer stretch of road through the towns of Choropampa, Magdalena and San Juan. More than 1,000 people maintain they were affected by the spill and many continue to report health effects.

A group of 1,100 villagers filed a lawsuit against Newmont in the U.S. seeking compensation for damages caused by the spill. In 2005, after failed attempts to reach a settlement, yanacocha mining, the plaintiffs announced they would go ahead with their suit before a Denver District judge.

Expanding the Mine

When Newmont proposed expanding Yanacocha to Cerro Quilish, a mountain four miles from the mine that holds an estimated 3.7 yanacocha mining ounces of gold, community members were concerned because Cerro Quilish sits atop the watershed supplying an entire valley of farmers and the city of Cajamarca.

Cerro Quilish has been spiritually important to the area's citizens since the time of the Incas, and in 2000, the city of Cajamarca declared Cerro Quilish a protected area.


View in a larger map.

In September 2004, residents of Cajamarca stepped up protests against the expansion. Thousands of people staged demonstrations and blocked access to the mine for 2 weeks. Protestors faced tear gas, police violence, and long nights, yanacocha mining asserting their right to free, prior, and informed consent and they refused to back down.

Finally Newmont announced in November 2004 that it would halt its exploration activities on Cerro Quilish. In a statement printed in Sia mining 1070 newspapers, Newmont admitted that it had not always listened to the valid claims and concerns expressed by the Cajamarca community in the past.

The next year however, Newmont was considering establishing a mining site near San Cerillo, an area that also acts as an important water supply for the community yanacocha mining. Many people around San Cerillo worry auto switching mining pool the impacts of a new mine on community.

Generating further concern, Newmont hired Peruvian police units to protect its workers and staff.

Local activists, harassed

Other nearby communities have also had reason to protest the Yanacocha mine.

In August 2006, about 100 residents in the town of Combayo, concerned about the mine's pollution of their water sources, took over land near Newmont's Carachugo pit, blocking Yanacocha vehicles from highway access. Newmont temporarily shut down operations at Carachugo due to the conflict, during which one protester was killed in unknown circumstances.

The mine ultimately hired a private security company to break up the protests and resume activity. The company negotiated with the government to monitor yanacocha mining quality and conduct a study on ensuring a steady water supply to the area in exchange for permission to resume and expand the operation.

In November 2006, Rev. Marco Arana, an activist with the anti-mining group GRUFIDES reported to a U.N. mission that he was under video surveillance by an individual connected to Newmont's security company. Arana and a colleague also reported receiving anonymous death threats.

That same month, another anti-mining activist, yanacocha mining, environmentalist Edmundo Becerra Corina, was shot and killed after receiving death threats just several days before being scheduled to meet with representatives from Peru's Ministry of Energy and Mines.

The U.N. mission announced it would conduct an investigation into whether Newmont's private security firm met the international standards established for private companies that provide services in conflict zones.

In May 2007, protests erupted again, yanacocha mining, along with continued harassment from the security company and more yanacocha mining threats. When Yanacocha failed to pay workers for their labor on a potable water project, villagers from the community of Totorcocha entered the Yanacocha property in protest.

The private security agents evicted the villagers, injuring several people and bringing 13 of them to the local police station.

Local groups and churches called on the company to take an active stance against these abuses attributed to mine contractors.

Lawsuit and Harassment of Defendant

In 2011, Newmont sued local farmer Maxima Acuña, claiming ownership of her land. Located next to a lake, yanacocha mining, the company considered this property critical for their mining operation. Acuña fought the lawsuit over a period of three years, during which she was harassed by police and even sentenced to prison. An appeals court finally ruled in her favor in December 2014, yanacocha mining, ruling that Newmont does not hold rights over the land.

Despite this victory, Maxima continues to get harassed. In early yanacocha mining, Newmont sent police officers invaded her home on three ocassions -- and most recently, even destroyed parts of her home.


For more information:

  • Guarngo:Choropampa: The Price of Gold is a documentary film about the Choropampa mercury spill and its aftermath.
  • View satellite image from Skytruth
  • Rocky Mountain News:Denver's Newmont Trying to Duck It's Responsibilities in Peru. 5 June 2004.
  • CAO: The Mercury Spill Of June 2, 2000 In The Vicinity Of San Juan, Choropampa, And Magdalena, Peru
  • PBS Frontline: Video: Peru: The Curse of Inca Gold. October 2005.
  • Chauvin, Lucien O. "Gold miner Yanacocha resumes operations after blockade." Metals Week. September 4, yanacocha mining, 2006.
  • Oro Sucio: Cerro Quilish. Short film.
  • Grupo GRUFIDES:www.grufides.org. Cajamarca-based environmental and social justice organization that monitors Yanacocha and supports communities in Cajamarca. Spanish.
  • EDGAR: 10-K SEC Filing, yanacocha mining, filed by NEWMONT MINING CORP /DE/. 3/15/2005.
  • The New York Times:Tangled Strands in Fight Over Peru Gold Mine, yanacocha mining. Jane Perlez and Lowell Bergman. October 25, 2005.
  • BBC:Aid case study: Peru's Yanacocha gold mine. March 15, 2002.
  • The New York Times:Tangled Strands in Fight Over Peru Gold Mine. Jane Perlez and Lowell Bergman. October 25, 2005.
  • Miami Herald:Peasants in Peru near showdown on mercury spill. Peter Hecht. March 5, 2005.
  • Reuters New Service: Newmont scales back at blockaded Peru gold mine.  September 17, 2004.
  • The New York Times: Tangled Strands in Fight Over Peru Gold Mine. Jane Perlez and Lowell Bergman. October 25, 2005.
  • Reuters New Service: Newmont scales back at blockaded Peru gold mine. September 17, 2004.
  • Newmont: Now and Beyond: Minera Yanacocha. November 2004. pg. 8.
  • The New York Times: Tangled Strands in Fight Over Peru Gold Mine. Jane Perlez and Lowell Bergman. October 25, 2005.
  • International Herald Tribune: Protests shut down production at gold mine in Peru. August 29, yanacocha mining, 2006.
  • Oxfam America: Newmont Update: 2007. April 24, 2007.
  • IPS News: Peru: U.N. Mission Yanacocha mining Private Yanacocha mining Groups. Angel Pez. February 7 yanacocha mining Oxfam Calls on Newmont Mining Company to Publicly Renounce Human Rights Abuses at Peruvian Gold Mine. July 31, 2007.

Tagged with: yanacocha, mining ethereum classic gpu health, peru, newmont, mercury spill, indigenous, gold mining, cajamarca

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Yanacocha - Wikipedia

Yanacocha is an open-pit, cyanide gold mine located 3,900 metres above sea level in Cajamarca. The site is operated by American multinational Newmont Mining Corporation, Peruvian company Minas Buenaventura (part of the Benavides group) and the World Bank International Finance Corporation (IFC). High in the Andean mountains of Peru is a gold mine, Yanacocha, run by Newmont Mining Corporation of Denver, Colorado, the largest gold mining company in the world. Once part of the Incan Empire, this land was conquered by . Apr 26, 2015 · It is the largest gold mine in Latin America, and The second largest gold mine in the world, producing over US$7 billion worth of gold to date. Minera Yanacocha S.R.L. (MYSRL) is the largest gold producer in Latin America and represents Perú's first large-scale heap-leaching operation. MYSRL consists of. Yanacocha mining news. Explore related Yanacocha articles for more information on the Yanacocha mining industry.

High in the Andean mountains of Peru is a gold mine, Yanacocha, run by Newmont Mining Corporation of Denver, Colorado, the largest gold mining company in the world. Once part of the Incan Empire, this land was conquered by . Yanacocha mining news. Explore related Yanacocha articles for more information on the Yanacocha mining industry. Unlock in-depth intelligence about Yanacocha. As data gatherers for over 30 years, MiningIntelligence is your trusted resource to put critical and timely information.



High in the Andean mountains of Peru is a gold mine, Yanacocha, run by Newmont Mining Corporation of Denver, Colorado, the largest gold mining company in the world. Once part of the Incan Empire, this land was conquered by the Spanish, who came in search of gold and silver. Descendants of the Incas remain suspicious to this day of outsiders seeking fortune here. FRONTLINE/World and New York Times reporter Lowell Bergman arrives to investigate a growing conflict between the local people and the Yanacocha Mine, which has already produced $7 billion worth of gold.

"In the language of the local Indians, Yanacocha means `black lake,' but the lake is long gone," says Bergman, "a casualty of this massive mining operation."

Today, the Yanacocha Mine spreads across more than 60 square miles at altitudes as high as 14,000 feet. Mine manager Brant Hinze tells Bergman that nearly $2 billion has been invested in the mine. Dressed in protective gear and wearing a respirator, Bergman is allowed to enter the heavily guarded "gold room," where ore is melted at a temperature of 2000 degrees Fahrenheit and the liquid gold is poured into bars worth more than $180,000 each. The golden scene of flowing molten metal resembles some ancient rite.

"There's a tradition among gold miners," says Bergman. "They say if you can lift a brick with one hand, it's yours to keep." Bergman makes a valiant effort, but it proves impossible.

The Yanacocha Mine recently celebrated the pouring of its 19 millionth ounce of gold. It is said to be the world's most productive gold mine.

"But behind the company's success is a dark and troubled history with allegations of corruption and bribery," says Bergman. It is a story that begins in 1994 during the presidency of Alberto Fujimori -- and provides a case study of "how a multinational company does business in a developing country rife with corruption."

The original owners of the Yanacocha Mine were Newmont; Buenaventura, a Peruvian company; and Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières (BRGM), a French government-owned company. But the partnership collapsed when the French tried to sell part of their shares to an Australian company that was a competitor of Newmont. Newmont and Buenaventura went to court to stop the French, and an epic battle ensued, pitting Newmont against the French company. Billions of dollars were at stake.

"The French government was behaving inappropriately in the litigation," says Larry Kurlander, a former Newmont senior executive. "In fact, I have seen with my own eyes a letter from [French president] Jacques Chirac to President Fujimori asking for his intervention in the case." Newmont sent Kurlander, a troubleshooter and former prosecutor, to Peru to "level the playing field" and help the company win their court case against the French. This is the first time Kurlander, an insider, has spoken publicly about what happened.

The legal fight went all the way to Peru's notoriously corrupt Supreme Court. Kurlander claims that the French were trying to bribe Peruvian politicians to influence the judges. But Antoine Blanca, France's ambassador to Peru at the time, denies that the French were paying bribes. On the contrary, Blanca tells Bergman, it was Newmont who was bribing people. Kurlander insists that is not true, but he does admit that he met privately with Vladimiro Montesinos, a very unsavory character who was President Fujimori's right-hand man, in an effort to enlist his help in thwarting the French. Kurlander argues that he had no choice, that he had to meet with Montesinos because "if the French were to be stopped, he was the only one in Peru who would dare to do it."

Montesinos is a notorious figure, "a crooked lawyer who made a short career of defending drug traffickers" before becoming "for all practical purposes" the man in charge of the Peruvian army and intelligence services, according to Mirko Lauer, a leading Peruvian journalist. It turns out that Montesinos was in the habit of secretly recording most of the meetings in his office. Many of these videotapes were later leaked to the press, causing the downfall of President Fujimori in 2000 and the arrest of Montesinos. "The videotapes show Montesinos cutting deals, bribing officials and handing out bricks of cash," says Bergman, as we see excerpts from these tapes, never before shown on television in the United States.

In one audio tape, Newmont's Kurlander meets with Montesinos, and the men part with a pledge of loyalty: "Now you have a friend for life."

Kurlander also lobbies the U.S. State Department to come to the aid of Newmont. Peter Romero, who was Assistant Secretary of State in charge of Latin America, tells Bergman that he actually called Montesinos on behalf of Newmont, though he was only trying to level the playing field. After the case was finally decided in Newmont's favor, Romero went to work for Newmont as a consultant.

Blanca says the French refused to meet with a criminal like Montesinos; moreover, they knew something else: "He was a CIA man."

Bergman's former CIA sources confirm that the CIA was paying Montesinos's secret police organization at least a million dollars a year and had done so for more than a decade. And in two of the secret videotapes, Montesinos is seen meeting with the CIA station chief in Lima, Peru's capital. On one tape, Montesinos vows to block what he says is evidence of French pressure on Peru's courts in the gold mine dispute.

In the most revealing of the tapes, Montesinos meets with the judge who will cast the deciding vote in the case, explaining that Peru needs Washington's support in a border dispute with Ecuador. A week later, the judge casts his vote in favor of Newmont, and Newmont wins controlling interest in the Yanacocha Mine.

Today, Montesinos is being held in a maximum-security prison in Peru, standing trial on dozens of counts of corruption. Kurlander tells Bergman he regrets meeting with Montesinos: "… the fact that you are in a country and you are forced to deal with a guy like this, it's a terrible thing."

In Peru, Ronald Gamarra -- the special prosecutor assigned to investigate judicial corruption under Montesinos -- tells Bergman, "My theory is that both sides [the French and the Americans] were trying to get a favorable decision by any means necessary, but only one side got to Montesinos and that is the side that won." But Gamarra says he was removed from the case before he could complete his investigation. Nevertheless, he declares, "I am sure bribes were paid."

Neither Newmont nor the French nor the Peruvian judge who met with Montesinos was ever convicted of participating in illegal activities in connection with the gold mine case. Under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the U.S. government did investigate allegations that Newmont paid bribes. "But that investigation ended late last year after the Peruvian government failed to fully cooperate and the statute of limitations ran out," says Bergman.

Today, Newmont is firmly in control of the Yanacocha Mine, but the company has encountered resistance from the local population. Some of the distrust of the mine and its operators may go back to the story of Atahualpa, the Incan emperor who was captured and held for ransom by the Spanish. To win his freedom, Atahualpa promised his captors to fill a room with gold, but the Spanish betrayed him -- they took the gold and killed him anyway.

Foreigners have been taking Peru's mineral wealth ever since, says Lauer: "And this is the basic historical lesson of these times, no? Unhappy people surrounded, watching very happy transnational corporations moving earth and digging gold."

In part, the sheer scale of the mining operation -- and its reliance on cyanide to recover the microscopic bits of gold in the crushed rock -- worries many campesinos in the region. "They are destroying our water, our hills, our flora and fauna," Miguel Garcia, a dairy farmer, tells Bergman, though Newmont says they safely contain the cyanide solution in lined holding ponds.

Trust between the campesinos and the mine really broke down in June 2000, when a truck contracted to carry mercury from the mine accidentally spilled 330 pounds of its toxic cargo over a 25-mile stretch of road around the village of Choropampa. Not knowing what it was, but attracted by the mercury's glimmer, villagers picked it up and took it home. They later fell sick, and many ended up in hospitals with symptoms of mercury poisoning. More than a thousand people are suing Newmont in a U.S. federal court for damages.

"Nobody was dead," says Roque Benavides, the CEO of Newmont's partner, Buenaventura. He also says that the company provided health insurance. "So it was not all that bad."

But the mercury spill provoked violent clashes between angry villagers and the police. It became a public relations nightmare for Newmont, and the company decided to dispatch Kurlander back to Yanacocha to see how the mine was operating. Kurlander's environmental audit found 20 high-priority problems at the mine. The findings were so serious that Kurlander warned in a memo to Newmont CEO Wayne Murdy that senior executives could be subject to "criminal prosecution and imprisonment."

For Kurlander, the environmental report was a turning point: "When we are out there preaching that we are guardians of the environment and you suddenly discover that we are not, it's like someone hits you in the stomach real hard."

Less than a year later, Kurlander retired from Newmont. Bergman requested an interview with Murdy to discuss the Yanacocha case, but Murdy declined. Since Kurlander's environmental audit, however, the company says they have spent more than $100 million on environmental improvements at the mine in Peru. They also provide more than 2,000 full-time staff jobs at the mine and pay substantial taxes.

The problem now for Newmont, according to Kurlander, is that the company has not regained the trust of many local people in Peru. Kurlander argues that Newmont needs something more than the government license it has to operate the Yanacocha Mine -- it needs a "social license" from the community. Benavides is skeptical of the "social license" concept, but the mine's manager tells Bergman he recognizes the need to work with and help the Indians in this impoverished region. Hinze says he hopes the mine "will be a neighbor here for a very long time'" and will continue to expand.

However, protesters have blocked the mine's plans to expand operations into a mountain called Cerro Quilish, which Newmont believes contains more than a billion dollars' worth of gold. For campesinos, Quilish is a sacred mountain and a source of precious water. "For Yanacocha, Quilish is a mountain of gold," says Catholic priest and local activist Father Marco Arana, "and for the people, it is a mountain of water. And Yanacocha didn't listen to the people."

Last fall, thousands of Peruvians filled the town square in Cajamarca, the city closest to the mine, protesting the expansion. Later they blockaded mining roads and forced the company to cancel its expansion plans.

"Communities are becoming more and more involved in their own destinies," says a chastened Kurlander. "When I say a social license, I mean it. Without the community support, you'll be out of business eventually. They will force you out of their community, and it doesn't matter how much government support you have."

 


CREDITS

Produced by
NELLI BLACK

Reported by
LOWELL BERGMAN
JANE PERLEZ

Editor
DAVID RITSHER

Senior Producers
DAVID RUMMEL
STEPHEN TALBOT

Additional Reporting
JASON FELCH
LAURA PUERTAS
MARLENA TELVICK

Camera
BRENT MCDONALD
BILL HEAD
DAVE BOWDEN

Sound
MARIO RIVAS

Associate Producer
NATASHA DEL TORO

Original Music
JUSTIN MELLAND

Translator
GEORGE AID

Map/Satellite Images
SKYTRUTH

Executive Producer
New York Times
ANN DERRY

A FRONTLINE/World Co-Production with The New York Times

 

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